There are two different types of standards for harnesses: those for climbing harnesses, and those for height safety. These are fundamentally different because of the requirements of each market area.

Outdoor education and adventure activities lie somewhere between the two. On one hand they are professional activities, and have to pay attention to health and safety requirements.  However the products used in them are largely derived from climbing harnesses, as well as, in some cases,  from height-safety harnesses. We are always more than happy to discuss standards and why certain products are built the way they are, we are constantly reviewing relevant standards and best practices in industries. If you have specific questions or just an off the cuff question contact us and we will be more than happy to help.

Glossary

Dynamic rope:
Climbing rope designed to have high elongation in a fall, which acts to absorb the energy of the fall.

Static rope (also called “low stretch rope”)
Rope designed to have minimal stretch so that it does not bounce during prusiking operations. In the USA Cordage Institute standard CI 1801, there are specific amounts of elongation that define “Static” and “Low-stretch”.

Fall factor:
Ratio between amount of rope in under load in a fall and the distance of the fall. Strictly speaking this should only be applied to dynamic ropes , as for other ropes the figure obtained is not independent of the rope length, and is not indicative of the impact on the rope.

Single rope:
Dynamic rope certified under EN 892 for use in lead climbing as a single strand

Half rope:
Dynamic rope certified under EN 892 for use in lead climbing with two strands used together but not “twinned”.

Twin rope:
Dynamic rope certified under EN 892 for use in lead climbing when “twinned”, that is both ropes pass through all protection elements and are subject to exactly the same impacts in a fall.